Christian Leperino

Facies

2014
Indian ink drawing on cardboard, (installation view) cm 210 x 300
istallazione fondino bianco ultimo

Facies/1

2014
Indian ink drawing on cardboard, cm 70 x 50
1

Facies/2

2014
Indian ink drawing on cardboard, cm 70 x 50
2

Facies/3

2014
Indian ink drawing on cardboard, cm 70 x 50
3

Facies/4

2014
Indian ink drawing on cardboard, cm 70 x 50
4

Facies/5

2014
Indian ink drawing on cardboard, cm 70 x 50
5

Facies/6

2014
Indian ink drawing on cardboard, cm 70 x 50
6

Facies/7

2014
Indian ink drawing on cardboard, cm 70 x 50
7

Facies/8

2014
Indian ink drawing on cardboard, cm 70 x 50
8

Facies/9

2014
Indian ink drawing on cardboard, cm 70 x 50
9

Facies/10

2014
Indian ink drawing on cardboard, cm 70 x 50
10

Facies/11

2014
Indian ink drawing on cardboard, cm 70 x 50
11

Facies/12

2014
Indian ink drawing on cardboard, cm 70 x 50
12

Facies/13

2014
Indian ink drawing on cardboard, cm 70 x 50
13

Facies/14

2014
Indian ink drawing on cardboard, cm 70 x 50
14

Facies/15

2014
Indian ink drawing on cardboard, cm 70 x 50
15

Facies/16

2014
Indian ink drawing on cardboard, cm 70 x 50
16

Facies/17

2014
Indian ink drawing on cardboard, cm 70 x 50
17

Facies/18

2016
Indian ink drawing on cardboard, cm 70 x 50
faces web

WRITINGS/Facies

2014
Istituto Italiano di Cultura di Tokyo, Japan, Designed by Gae Aulenti
1236789121013

WRITINGS/Facies

2014

WRITINGS/Facies

2014
IMG_3089 webIMG_3090 webIMG_3078 webIMG_3093 webIMG_3095 web

 

 

Writings

by Carla Rossetti and Massimo Tartaglione

 

The relationship between cultures, exchanges and reciprocal influences is at the forefront now more than ever. It unfolds in a very articulated range of phenomena of uncertain balance between the growing pressures to standard and the closures in identity dimensions, thus plotting a complex path of risks, opportunities. In investigating processes that are continuously becoming unpredictable, we must compete with their dialectical nature and recognise an area of mutual influence next to one of autonomy, meaning that every speech and every method of expression can have its own margin of error.

If cultural exchanges are first and foremost a matter of relationships, then it is possible to identify a place that, par excellence, is the means and the heart of all relationships: the body. As suggested by Galimberti, space is not “positional”: it is not the real or logical context in which things are arranged in accordance with an abstract system of presumed coordinates. Instead, it is “situational” because it is measured by starting from the situation in which the body finds itself to the proposed tasks and the available possibilities that it has. As a consequence, not only is the world discovered through the body, but it establishes profiles through actions: the reflection of a world can be seen in the body; and flesh in that of the world.[1]

However, as stated by Carlo Sini, the body as threshold acts and tries to change world and so it meets its resistance, breaks it and experiments its own limits. Images, sounds and words comes to us with such a force that they leave a physical mark on body, but the same images and sounds represent languages, postures, gestures that lay, digging beyond the body surface.

A tight knot closes this starting point, and perhaps ends a lesson on the construction of relationships between cultures, which do not exclude, but intimately assimilate, a dark and violent base line, and ferry us out of the isolated dimension of the Galimberti type body, towards the heartfelt interpretation of Husserl.

As a matter of fact, bodies make – you might say – body, and it is in this context that the network of relationships takes on an ethical purpose, that within the exhibition is accompanied by a strictly aesthetic one. This premise would be of little value if there was not the belief of a specific visual strength of our subject/object in question which, moreover, the history of art documents with so much evidence that it makes any example superfluous. However, the artists have succeeded in putting this together, by transforming and expanding those that are just mere assumptions.

By outlining the first area, it is placed inside a second and broader one: urban space.

The reason for this choice does not lie in the claim that the metropolitan dimension or that of the Nation-state are sufficient enough to deplete the dynamics that innervate the exhibition project. On the contrary, with the firm belief that if a swarming activity develops within cities, in which the opposing and contrasting tensions find a fruitful consequence, it is thanks to their porosity and opening of cultural boundaries. In view of deconstructing as a channel, not only theoretical but one of reality, Jacques Derrida revealed the fragility of resistant structures such as “State”, “citizenship”, “belonging”, “territory”.[2] About the crushing of traditional space, Jean-Luc Nancy proposed the term monde-ville, or rather worldville, thus defining a new transnational geography.[3] Pure words and pictures, free from any support – also of a historic kind – have never existed except as an illusion. Yet, with the development of tele-technologies – as Derrida says – a revolution in semiotics has been produced in which the signs are produced and broadcast at an unbelievable and frenetic speed, and therefore frees itself from a defined location. And it is precisely this shift, this possibility of mutual reflection between one place and another, that is the backbone of the exhibition project. When the city, urban practices, territory, and even the individual are pulverized, and get mixed up, the paradoxical aspect of the body is that even though it is involved in this process, it retains its look and, ultimately, itself.

To complete the reference framework within which the artists have moved, a brief reference to the techniques used seems the right thing to do.

The four selected artists work on paper, through drawing, engraving or photography. The choice of combining drawing – in a broad acceptation which includes also the engraving techniques – and photography stems from a specific suggestion, masterfully captured by the words of Giulio Paolini: «Photography and design seem to have in common, and share the attitude – what I would call vocation – that shines through: transparency has no end, it tends towards infinity, it is not an “image” but it makes you “imagine”. To always see beyond the contingent limit.»[4] It is known that, in the presence of the first Dagherro-type tests, the problem was to identify the artistic value of the photographic object next to the camouflaged one. Peirce masterfully succeeded by giving the cellulose image a triple nature: “index”, “icon”, and “symbol”.[5]

This gradual approach between referentiality and expression, that is, to say, between representative realism and the solicitations of a different nature, which burst into the figurative field for the entrance of dream and desire, determines the epiphany of subjectivity. Such epiphany shows how representative realism and artistic creativity are neither rivals nor opponents, but rather an element that photography shares with the other arts, again according to Paolini. Drawing, first and foremost, because of its lightness and its fragility that open up that manner of exhibiting that Greenblatt called resonance and wonder.[6] For the English, resonance is the power of the object to cross its formal limits, in order to evoke the complex and dynamic cultural forces from which it emerged in the viewer. Wonder means the ability of the object to stop the visitor and communicate a sense of uniqueness. Drawing and photography can therefore be channels for synergies with other practices of representation that are present in a culture, and can bring historical circumstances to the surface like a distant echo, in an open dialogue with each other.

Drawing, particularly, in its most essential and even elementary nature, represents a fundamental mode of manifestation of the visual content in arts, even when its purpose is purely communicative. It is therefore especially close to an idea of crossing cultures and mediums, which can be recognized, at least on a formal level, even in very different contexts and often presents a closeness to the moment the idea and the plan come together for this expressive practice. Enrico Crispolti pointed out that, in the 20th century, drawing was particularly important for artistic research, in that it is more related to the time and methods of experimentation. This proximity to research can be read both in terms of form, and of the historical relationship with the art of the past or of another geographical location. The “mobility” of drawing is a strong dialectic means in its expressive sense, but is an open one with regards to communication and confrontation.

 




[1] U. Galimberti, Il corpo, published by Feltrinelli, Milan, 1983.

[2] J. Derrida, Spettri di Marx, published by Cortina, Milan, 1994.

[3] J.L. Nancy, La città lontana, published by Ombre corte, Verona, 2002.

[4] AA.VV. Arte in Italia dopo la fotografia, published by Electa, Milan, 2011.

[5] C. S. Pierce, Opere, published by Bompiani, Milan, 2003.

[6] S. Greenblatt, Risonanze e meraviglia in I. Karp, S. Lavine, (eds.) in Culture in mostra, Clueb, Bologna, 1995

 

 

Writings

Carla Rossetti e Massimo Tartaglione

 

Il tema del rapporto tra culture, degli scambi, delle reciproche influenze è oggi più che mai all’ordine del giorno e mostra un’ampia gamma di fenomeni in equilibrio tra le crescenti spinte all’uniformazione e le chiusure nella dimensione identitaria, si definisce così un complesso corteo di rischi e opportunità. Nell’indagare processi che sono in continuo, imprevedibile divenire, bisognerà allora misurarsi con la loro natura dialettica, riconoscendo un territorio di reciproca influenza accanto ad una zona di autonomia, che ogni discorso, ogni dire, può avere il suo margine di errore.

Se gli scambi tra culture sono anzitutto questione di rapporti, è allora possibile riconoscere un luogo che, per eccellenza, è il tramite e la sede di tutte le relazioni: il corpo. Come suggerito da Galimberti, infatti, lo spazio non è “posizionale”: non è l’ambito reale o logico in cui le cose si dispongono obbedendo a un sistema astratto di coordinate presupposte. È invece “situazionale”, perché si misura partendo dalla situazione in cui viene a trovarsi il corpo di fronte ai compiti che si propone e alle possibilità di cui dispone. Ne consegue non soltanto che il mondo si conosce attraverso il corpo, ma è quest’ultimo a definirne i profili mediante le proprie azioni: nel corpo s’intravede il riflesso di un mondo; nel mondo quello della carne.[1]

Inoltre, come ha affermato Carlo Sini, il corpo come soglia e limite agisce cercando di modificare il mondo e così ne incontra la resistenza, la infrange e ne subisce l’inerzia, sperimentando i propri limiti; le immagini, i suoni che ci giungono dall’esterno ci colpiscono con un’intensità tale da lasciare un’impronta fisica sul corpo, ma quelle stesse immagini e suoni rappresentano pratiche, linguaggi, posture, gestualità, modi di vita che, come tali, si depositano, scavando oltre la superficie corporea. Questo spunto stringe in un nodo serrato una via, forse anche una lezione per la costruzione di rapporti tra culture, che non escludono, anzi assimilano intimamente, un fondo di tenebra e violenza, traghettandoci fuori dalla dimensione isolata del corpo galimbertiano, verso la coralità dell’interpretazione husserliana.

I corpi, infatti, fanno – si potrebbe dire – corpo, ed è in quest’ottica che la rete di relazioni assume una portata etica, che in seno alla mostra si accompagna a quella più propriamente estetica. Quanto si è detto sarebbe poca cosa se non ci fosse la convinzione di una forza specificamente visiva del nostro (s)oggetto d’indagine, che, per di più, la storia dell’arte documenta con un’evidenza tale da rendere superflua ogni esemplificazione, e che gli artisti hanno saputo interpretare ed ampliare con una straordinaria capacità di messa a fuoco.

Nella mostra il corpo come luogo è collocato all’interno di un contesto più ampio: lo spazio urbano.

Il motivo di tale scelta non risiede nella pretesa che la dimensione metropolitana, o quella dello Stato-nazione siano sufficienti a esaurire le dinamiche che innervano il progetto espositivo; al contrario, nella ferma convinzione che se all’interno delle città si sviluppa un’attività formicolante, in cui le tensioni oppositive e contrastanti conoscono anche un risvolto fruttuoso, è in virtù della loro porosità e di una slabbratura dei confini culturali. Jacques Derrida, nell’ottica della decostruzione come alveo non solo teorico ma dell’accadere della realtà, ha rivelato la fragilità di strutture resistenti come “Stato”, “cittadinanza”, “appartenenza”, “territorio”[2]. Riguardo alla frantumazione degli spazi tradizionali Jean-Luc Nancy ha proposto il termine di monde-ville, definendo così una nuova geografia transnazionale[3]. Le parole e le immagini pure, svincolate da ogni supporto – anche di tipo storico – non sono mai esistite se non come illusione e tuttavia con lo sviluppo delle tele tecnologie, come le definisce Derrida, si è verificata una vera rivoluzione semiotica in cui i segni sono prodotti e trasmessi con una velocità impensabile e frenetica, emancipandosi da una localizzazione definita. Ed è questo scivolamento di un luogo nell’altro, del corpo nella città e vice versa, che rappresenta un asse centrale dell’insieme delle opere. Quando la città, le pratiche urbane, la cittadinanza, il territorio, e persino l’individuo si polverizzano, mescolandosi, l’aspetto paradossale del corpo è che pur coinvolto in questo processo, conserva il proprio sguardo e, in ultimo, se stesso.

A completare il quadro di riferimento dentro il quale gli artisti si sono mossi, un breve cenno alle tecniche utilizzate sembra doveroso.

I quattro artisti selezionati lavorano su carta, attraverso il disegno, l’incisione o la fotografia. La scelta di accostare il disegno – in un’accezione ampia che comprende anche le tecniche incisorie – e la fotografia nasce da una precisa suggestione, colta magistralmente dalle parole di Giulio Paolini: «Fotografia e disegno sembrano possedere in comune, condividere l’attitudine – che vorrei chiamare vocazione – a far trasparire: la trasparenza non ha fine, tende all’infinito, non fa “immagine” ma fa “immaginare”.Vedere sempre al di là del limite contingente”»[4].

È noto come, a cospetto delle prime prove dagherrotipiche, il problema fu quello di riconoscere il valore artistico dell’oggetto fotografico accanto a quello mimetico. Ci riuscì magistralmente Peirce, attribuendo all’immagine in cellulosa una triplice natura, di “indice”, “icona”, “simbolo[5]. Questo graduale avvicinamento fra referenzialità ed espressione, ossia fra realismo rappresentativo e le sollecitazioni, di natura diversa,che irrompono nel campo figurativo per l’ingresso del sogno e del desiderio, determina l’epifania della soggettività, dimostrando quanto realismo rappresentativo e creatività artistica non siano né rivali, né contrapposti, bensì un elemento che, per ritornare a Paolini, la fotografia condivide con le altre arti.

Il disegno, anzitutto, perché la sua leggerezza, la sua fragilità aprono a quella modalità dell’esporre che Greenblatt ha chiamato della risonanza e della meraviglia[6]. Per lo studioso inglese, la risonanza è il potere dell’oggetto di varcare i propri limiti formali, al fine di evocare nel visitatore le forze culturali complesse e dinamiche da cui è emerso. Per meraviglia intende la capacità dell’oggetto di arrestare il visitatore, comunicandogli un senso di unicità. Il disegno e la fotografia possono dunque essere i tramiti per sinergie con altre pratiche di rappresentazione presenti in una cultura, possono far affiorare come un’eco lontana circostanze storiche in aperto dialogo tra loro.

Tanto più che il disegno, nei suoi tratti di essenzialità e persino elementarità, rappresenta una modalità fondante di manifestazione del contenuto visivo nelle arti, anche quando abbia un intento puramente comunicativo. È quindi particolarmente vicino a un’idea di attraversamento delle culture, di medium, che può essere riconosciuto, almeno sul piano formale, in contesti anche molto differenziati dal punto di vista culturale e che spesso presenta una vicinanza con il momento ideativo, progettuale e di ricerca della pratica artistica. Enrico Crispolti ha sottolineato come nel XX secolo il disegno sia stato particolarmente importante per la ricerca artistica, in quanto risulta maggiormente collegato con i tempi e i modi della sperimentazione. Questa vicinanza alla ricerca può essere letta sia sul piano delle forme, sia su quello del rapporto storico con l’arte del passato o di un altro luogo geografico. La “mobilità” del disegno costituisce un tramite dialettico forte, nel senso della portata espressiva, ma aperto sul terreno comunicativo e del confronto.

 




[1] Cfr. U.Galimberti, Il corpo, Feltrinelli, Milano, 1983.

[2] Cfr. J.Derrida, Spettri di Marx, Cortina, Milano, 1994.

[3] Cfr. J.L. Nancy, La città lontana, Ombre corte, Verona, 2002.

[4] Cfr. AA.VV. Arte in Italia dopo la fotografia, Electa, Milano, 2011.

[5] Cfr. C. S. Pierce, Opere, Bompiani, Milano, 2003.

[6] Cfr. S. Greenblatt, Risonanze e meraviglia in I. Karp, S. Lavine, a cura di, Culture in mostra, Clueb, Bologna, 1995.